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Lorraine Remer

Research Prof

Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology
Geography and Environmental Systems
Physics
Phone
410-908-0836
remer@umbc.edu
Education
Ph D, University of California, Davis (1991)
MS, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego (1983)
BS, University of California, Davis (1980)
About

Lorraine Remer spent 21 years at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center involved in the remote sensing of aerosol and the use of remote sensing data for the study of aerosols in climate processes, how aerosol particles affect clouds, aerosol transport and particulate air pollution. Her first position at Goddard in 1991 was in the role of a support scientist, employed by Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), where she contributed to the development of the MODIS aerosol algorithms. In 1998 Dr, Remer joined the Federal civil service, and in 2012 she left NASA to become a part of JCET-UMBC. Currently she is working on aerosol remote sensing for the MODIS, VIIRS and PACE missions. She also contributes to measuring aerosols from ground-based and air-borne sensors Dr. Remer has served on a variety of national and international panels. She has co-edited a textbook, Aerosol Remote Sensing, and is currently an editor of the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. Dr. Remer was named a 'highly cited' scientist in geosciences by Thomson-Reuters for the time period 2002 - 2012, and recently was elected as Fellow of the American Geophysical Union.

Research Interests

Dr. Remer's research interests include remote sensing of aerosol and the use of remote sensing data for the study of aerosols in climate processes, how aerosol particles affect clouds, aerosol transport and particulate air pollution. She is also interested in atmospheric correction for ocean and land remote sensing.

Teaching Interests

Atmospheric Physics, Atmospheric Science, Environmental Science, Physical Geography, Remote Sensing.

Selected Classes
Fall 2015 GES 381 – Introduction to Remote Sensing